I  love to get fresh baked, organic bread.  Eating it with some fresh organic butter, yum! Many people say it is not so good for your body ( think bloating, gaining weight etc.), and some say it is especially a bad idea when you suffer from an autoimmune disease like Celiac disease or Hashimoto’s disease. Scientists think people who have an autoimmune disorder like Hashimoto’s disease like I have, have a body that sees gluten as an foreign invader and want to fight it, but accidentally mistake thyroid cells for gluten therefore also attacking the thyroid, oops! But I LOVE bread! How can I live without bread? Is that even possible? It is! I have been gluten-free and eating no bread for almost 10 months now on the AutoImmune Protocol diet, and it is hard, but my bloodwork does come back better with 35% less inflammation if I strictly stick to this AIP Diet. But I still crave bread every day. I think I always will have a bread addiction, even if I don’t eat it. Let’s explore my love of bread a little more!

Different kinds of bread that I love

The famous Italian ciabatta, the French baguette, the multi-grain breads that you can find in the Netherlands, Germany and Sweden to name a few countries with great heave multi-grain breads. Bread is one of the oldest prepared foods in the world. Nothing gives a house a nicer smell in my opinion, than a loaf of fresh baked bread.

Lonneke at a farmers market looking at organic bre
Lonneke at a farmers market looking at organic bread

A few fun facts on bread

  • *Bread is usually made with simple ingredients, love & attention. You only need (wheat) flour, water, yeast and salt to make the bread. An oven to bake it, and some time to spend to make it. Bread is usually eaten the day it is baked.
  • *You know the French bread goes stale pretty quickly, as they are not allowed by law to use preservatives. That’s why some French people buy fresh bread twice, in morning, and afternoon for dinner time (imagine the image of a French person on a bike with baguettes in the front basket or on the back of the bike under the carrier straps) You can revive stale baguettes by spraying it lightly with cold water, wrap it in a towel, and then put in a preheated oven on 350F for 5 minutes. You can also use stale baguettes by chopping it, spraying it with olive oil, and putting it in a preheated oven on 350F until the pieces get a brown color and become crunchy. Great addition for soups or salads. Talking about recycling!
  • French toast, a worldwide favorite sweet dish, is made with leftover bread slices. (another great way to recycle bread) Dipped in a mixture of lightly beaten eggs, milk, sugar and cinnamon and then baked in a bit of butter. In my home country it is called “Wentelteefjes”. Adding a bit of maple syrup, agave syrup or anything else sweet you like, it is a great Sunday Morning breakfast. There are so many different varieties in the world!.

    French Toast
    French toast
  • Another great thing is bread machines, if you are not that great of a baker. You can add all the ingredients and after about 4 hours you have fresh baked bread. There is a timer so you can time it. You can wake up in the morning with a great smelling house and warm bread! I can also add flaxseeds, raisins, cinnamon, nuts. Or olives, dried tomatoes for savory bread. The shape is not really like what you are used to for a loaf of bread, but it does taste good!

Abigail O’Neill shared a great recipe to make your own sourdough bread.

Avocado toast is my favorite

Check out this earlier article I wrote about Avocado Toast

Avocado on bread by Cafe Gitane
The famous Cafe Gitane avocado toast!

Going gluten-free

I was very sad when I found out I should not eat gluten anymore. I now only look and sniff at organic breads at farmers markets and bakeries. But luckily, more bakeries bake gluten-free bread, which is a great idea! You can also bake it at home, and I will go into gluten-free baking more on organiceyourlife.com in the future.

Le Pain Quotidien has their own loaf of bread made of seeds and gluten-free grains.

In Memory of Bread

To get over my mourning over bread, I read this great book called “In Memory of Bread” by a guy who was just like me obsessed with bread (and he was also obsessed with beer) until he found out that was exactly what was making him sick. (He suffers from a serious wheat allergy). His book shows him mourning over the loss of bread, his memories of eating freshly baked bread, brewing beer and his road back to health. While sharing reasons why he got to suffer from a serious wheat allergy, he is also finding solace in his gluten-free food future.

book in Memory of Bread by Paul Graham
Book in Memory of Bread by Paul Graham

I will always love bread, and if you can still eat it, please enjoy it as much as I always did!

Love, Lonneke